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Posts tagged ‘Thatch’

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LABC Registered Details

labc_4890_reg_regdetails_reduced

Thatching Advisory Services (TAS) have received notification that both their Thatch Fireboard System and Thatch Firewall Membrane System has been approved and added to the Local Authority Building Control (LABC) Registered Details database. LABC registration is a one-off certification process proving compliance with building regulations and standards across the UK.

The registered details database contains various products and systems, which once certified, are accepted by LABC building control surveyors in over 300 local authorities across the country. This assures the whole construction industry that a product or system has been rigorously checked by LABC surveyors.

Full details on both systems can be viewed via the LABC links below:

LABC – Thatch Firewall Membrane System

LABC – Thatch Fireboard System

 

 

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Thatchsayf used on Maudslay Park newbuild

Maudslay Park

TAS recently carried out the application of its Thatchsayf Fire Retardant Spray System to a new build property, which is part of the Maudslay Park development – a new Retirement Village in the Warwickshire village of Great Alne. The thatched property is intended to be a shop for the village and provide warden accommodation. The roof which is approximately 210m² – 22 thatchers’ sq was thatched by Parkinson Master Thatchers.

Prior to the thatching, the roof benefited from the installation of the Thatch Fireboard Protection System comprising TAS100 Thatch Fireboards and 100mm of Thatchbatts®.

The application of the fire retardant was partly carried out using a boom lift (cherry picker). TAS operatives are licenced to operate boom and scissor lifts, which can often reduce the time it takes to treat a roof and also ensures close contact with the thatch. This also allows for greater control and coverage when treating the roof. You can see from this image where the Thatchsayf has already been applied.

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Thatchsayf Spray System – Thatch Fire Retardant

Thatchsayf - Fire Retardant

Fire – Causes

A report from fire investigators Burgoynes into the cause of thatch fires revealed ejected embers and sparks as one of the main causes.

Investigations have shown that many thatch fires relate to the use of wood burning stoves and have occurred within 30 minutes of the stove being lit. In addition, some home-owners were found to be using unsuitable materials to get the wood burner/fire started in the first place.

Other causes can increase the risk of the effects from ejected embers or sparks, these include:

Spark Arrestors – If not cleaned at least once a year then soot deposits can build up and ignite causing a fire in their own right, which in turn could cause a thatch fire. A number of fire services recommend the removal of spark arrestors although a wire-mesh bird guard could be installed to deter birds from nesting but still allow the chimney to function efficiently.

Chimney Height – The risk of a thatch fire is further increased when the chimney height has been reduced following many years of re-coating works, this is more common with thatching materials such as long straw.

 

 

 

 

 

Fire Retardant Sprays

The main purpose of a fire retardant is to starve the ignition area of oxygen and therefore delay the spread of flame and the full development of a thatch fire. The idea is to buy more time so that the fire and rescue service have a greater chance of extinguishing the fire before it fully develops.

Thatchsayf Spray System is a water based solution containing fire retardant and intumescent ingredients for the protection of thatched roofing.

This environmentally friendly solution is applied externally to the thatch surface and penetrates the stems of the thatch by up to 75mm, forming a thin protective film on the surface of the thatch stems.

A treated roof will offer protection from a number of fire risks, including sparks, ejected embers, bonfires, Chinese lanterns, fireworks and barbecues.

On exposure to these risks, Thatchsayf Spray System will ‘foam up’ (intumesce) and form a carbonised char, which binds the thatch stems together, cutting off the supply of oxygen to the fire, delaying the spread of flame and lowering the radiated heat output.

The application of Thatchsayf Spray System is undertaken by our fully trained employees using specialist spraying equipment and is normally carried out between March and the end of October. This is due to the high levels of moisture in the air during the winter months.

Once a roof is treated, the homeowner is issued with a Certificate of Completion, which is valid for five years after which re-application is required.

A new build/newly thatched roof offers a good opportunity to treat a roof. However, an existing thatched roof can also be treated as long as it is in good condition. Thatchsayf Spray System can be applied as a standalone product or in addition to having a physical fire barrier system installed.

We suggest you contact your insurance company to check if any discounts are available for taking a proactive approach by treating the roof with a fire retardant spray and fire barriers.

Testing

Thatchsayf Spray System has been tested to vigorous testing by the British Research Establishment (BRE). Further details of testing is available upon request. Thatchsayf Spray System is tested to BS476 Part 3 and achieved the designation of EXT.S.BA

The benefits of Thatchsayf Spray System

  • Fire penetration may be delayed for over 30 minutes with no spread of flame
  • Can be applied to new or existing thatched roofs
  • Contains preservatives
  • Retards bacterial and fungal growth including moss
  • Application is fully certified for 5 years
  • Environmentally friendly
  • May reduce insurance premiums

 

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Unique thatched project – Enterprise Centre

Following our epic journey to the Isle of Harris in July, TAS then embarked on another unusual project after we were approached by Master Thatcher – Stephen Letch for our thoughts on treating a unique thatched building in Norfolk with our Thatchsayf fire retardant spray system.

We were aware of a project at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in which Stephen and his team of thatchers had been busy carrying out ‘vertical’ thatching to the walls of the Enterprise Centre. Stephen then confirmed that this was indeed the project.

Please click on the thumbnail images to view the full size images and slide show.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The project incorporated a unique thatch cassette cladding system which had not been used anywhere in the world. The process saw 294 individual cassettes thatched off-site using straw from the Norfolk/Suffolk borders. The thatch cassettes were then transported to site and erected onto the façade of the building.

Please click on the links below for a couple of great videos showing the thatched cassettes and cladding take shape:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7NyuO_z-84

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEA_25II144

We were initially invited to the centre by the Project Director from main contractor Morgan Sindall and the Lead Architect from Architype to carry out a trial application of the Thatchsayf to a small sample area of the thatch as questions were raised about discolouration to the thatch. Once satisfied, both parties instructed us to carry out the application to the entire thatched façades – around 1,000m² or 108 thatchers’ square.

Gary and Stuart from TAS then spent the best part of a week carrying out the application using cherry pickers and their specialist spraying equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Enterprise Centre, which is a Passivhaus and BREEAM Outstanding building, is the greenest in Britain and one of the most sustainable buildings in Europe.

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Buying a thatched property

Many prospective owners of thatched houses are often dissuaded by friends and family who ‘wrongly advise’ that owning a thatched property is expensive, has an increased risk of fire and requires constant attention. This is not the case!

However, if you are considering owning a thatched property that is part of our national heritage, it is advisable to find out as much information about the property as possible.

Below are some suitable questions to ask:

  • Which thatcher does the current owner use?
  • What thatching works have been carried out and when?
  • What materials have been the used on the both the ridge and main coatwork?
  • Does the owner or thatcher know if any fire barriers have been fitted?

It may be worth considering a separate survey for a thatched roof. A local thatcher is the best person to offer an opinion on the current condition and advise when future works are likely to be required and what the costs will be.

It is also advisable to find out as much information about the chimney especially if there is an open fire or a wood burner installed.

  • Find out if a liner is installed. If so, ask what type of liner is it and who installed it?  Ask for copies of any related installation documents such as a HETAS certificate etc.
  • Has the chimney and/or liner been inspected by means of a CCTV inspection, if so request details
  • When was the chimney last swept and by whom?
  • Does the chimney have a spark arrestor fitted?

Find out when the electrical circuits were last inspected and tested. Insurance companies will require electrical test inspections, so request a copy of the last inspection certificate.

Finally, speak to specialist insurance companies beforehand. They may have a ‘check-list’ or certain criteria that has to be met.

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Chimneys in thatch

There are approximately 60,000 thatched properties in the UK, of which 50-80 suffer a serious fire each year, most of which are completely destroyed. 90% of the homes struck by thatch fire have a combination of a wood burning stove either a flexible chimney liner or no liner at all.

Condition
Chimneys should be checked to ensure the brick or stonework is in good condition. Old or poorly maintained chimneys with loose or missing bricks & mortar and not lined, could allow hot gases and smoke to escape into upper rooms, the loft space or directly onto the thatch. If re-thatching works are taking place and the thatch around the chimney stack is removed, the thatcher will be able to advise on its condition.

Maintenance
Ensure chimneys are regularly swept by an experienced and qualified chimney sweep. This normally needs to be done at least twice a year, however if the chimney is used frequently during the winter period then additional sweeping may be required. Your sweep will be able to offer you further advice. Many chimney engineers and other specialist companies offer a CCTV survey, this is recommended to check the internal condition of the flue.  Again check with your property insurer because some of them have a list of approved companies.

Liner
A number of thatch fires occur as a result of old or inappropriate flue liners, therefore chimneys serving either an open fire  or multi-fuel appliance should be suitably lined. Contact an appropriate professional body such as HETAS so a registered  chimney engineer can review the liner (if already installed) to ensure it is fit for purpose for the type of appliance or fire in  use.

An engineer will also be able to advise on the condition of the liner and recommend on how often it should be  checked. If you are considering installing a wood-burner or similar, again contact HETAS who will advise on the most  suitable appliance and liner for the property.

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Thatching Advisory Services – New Website

Thatched cliff-top shelter overlooking Seaton beach

Thatching Advisory Services (TAS) recently launched it’s new website. The new site contains the latest information on fire protection as well as comprehensive advice on buying, owning and maintaining thatched properties. There is a new section devoted to new builds and extensions which includes detailed information on roof construction and the latest building regulations.

There is comprehensive information on all our products and systems and a new facility to buy the products via our online shop.

Have a look around the site and feel free to contact us with feedback or if you have any further questions or queries.

www.thatchingadvisoryservices.co.uk

 

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Thatchsayf – Stream Cottage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thatching Advisory Services recently completed the application of Thatchsayf fire retardant to Stream Cottage in Glynde, East Sussex.

The Grade II listed cottage is one of the oldest in the Glynde parish, dating back to 1556.

Prior to the new thatch, the roof structure also had TAS100 Thatch Fireboards and Thatchbatts® installed.

The 127m² roof was thatched by Gavin MacDonald Master Thatcher

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New Meeting room at Thatchers Cider

Thatching Advisory Services - Thatchers Cider

A new meeting room currently being built at Thatchers Cider has been designed to showcase sustainable construction techniques. With that in mind, the Sandford cider maker asked Somerset master thatchers, Dunbar & Bunce to install a new thatched roof.

Passionate about conservation, both Tom and Nigel – together with their team of highly skilled thatchers, provide an extremely knowledgeable and sympathetic approach to both historic buildings as well as modern applications, such as new houses and extensions.

It is being built with a solid oak framework and natural stone walls. Prior to the actual thatching,  the roof  timbers were covered with Thatch Firewall Membrane, which is one of the fire barriers provided by Thatching Advisory Services.

Martin Thatcher, Managing Director says, “Our new meeting room is being built in the heart of a beautiful part of one of our orchards, in a thicket, overlooking a pond. It is an opportunity for us to show how we embrace nature. Beinyears.”

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TAS asked to write for Listed Property Owners Club Magazine

Rob Norcott of Thatching Advisory Services was asked by Listed Property Owners’ Club Ltd.  to write an article for latest magazine.

Listed Heritage Magazine is published by the Listed Property Owners’ Club for their members. This is a full colour, perfectly bound A4 production; it is published bi-monthly and distributed to 19,000 listed property owners. The Listed Heritage Magazine includes amongst other things: suppliers directory, members letters, shopping pages, events and properties for sale.

The 4 page piece was centered around the importance of separation in construction on thatched roofs. The article also takes you through common causes of thatch fires, from old or faulty electrical systems through to bonfires or fireworks. It also discusses the various systems and preventive measures available such as Thatch Fire Board System, Thatch Fire Wall System; the use of Thatchbatts® and the Thatchsayf spray.

To see the full article click the link below:

TAS article for Listed Heritage – Issue 95

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